ABSTRACTS VOLUME 4 ISSUE 3

Selected Papers from the 2nd International Conference on Language Education and Research

TITLE: STANCE AND GRAMMATICAL COMPLEXITY IN CONVERSATION:
AN UNLIKELY PARTNERSHIP DISCOVERED THROUGH CORPUS ANALYSIS

AUTHOR: DOUGLAS BIBER

APPLIED LINGUISTICS PROGRAM
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
NORTHERN ARIZONA UNIVERSITY
FLAGSTAFF, AZ, USA 86011
DOUGLAS.BIBER@NAU.EDU

Citation:

Biber, D.  (2020) Stance and Grammatical Complexity in Conversation: An Unlikely Partnership Discovered through Corpus Analysis, Journal of Applied languages and Linguistics, 4(3), ALS House Publications. Athens, Greece, pp. 5-19

Abstract

The present paper attempts to synthesize results from two independent lines of corpus-based research: One focused on grammatical complexity, and the second focused on the expression of stance. The paper begins by describing an unexpected pattern of use in conversational discourse: Despite the fact that conversation is co-constructed by multiple participants, producing language in real-time and discussing personal topics, it is characterized by an extremely dense use of dependent clauses. Corpus-based findings regarding the use of stance expressions are less surprising, showing how stance devices are more commonly used in conversation than in academic writing. The main focus of the present paper is to explore the intersection between these two lines of research, showing how many grammatically complex structures in conversation are used to support the functional prominence given to the expression of stance in that register. That is, utterances in conversation often involve two grammatical components, with an idea or a report of an action occurring as the dependent clause, and an expression of stance occurring as the main clause that provides the interpretive frame for the information in the dependent clause. As a result, it is not a coincidence that personal expressions of stance as well as complex grammatical structures are both so prevalent in conversational discourse.
© Applied Language Studies House Publications 2020. All rights reserved.

Keywords: grammatical complexity; stance; conversational discourse; LGSWE; LSWE Corpus

TITLE: TWENTY YEARS OF "GRAMMAR MACNUGGETS"

AUTHOR: SCOTT THORNBURY   

Citation:

Thornbury, S. (2020) Twenty years of "grammar MacNuggets", Journal of Applied languages and Linguistics, 4(3), pp. 20-25

Abstract

Twenty years ago, at a conference in Dublin, I coined the term “grammar McNuggets.” In doing so, I wanted to capture the way that coursebooks deliver grammar in palatable, bite-sized morsels. To my way of thinking, this compartmentalization of language (an essentially shapeless and fluid phenomenon) reflected the way fast-food chains package, market and deliver their products – not so much as real food but as a simulation of real food. Twenty years later, “grammar McNuggets” seem as entrenched as ever. In this paper I will review and critique the way that grammar has been commodified, and report the results of research into why such a view persists.
© Applied Language Studies House Publications 2020. All rights reserved.


Keywords: grammar, pedagogy, commodification, synthetic vs analytic syllabus

TITLE: CORRECTIVE FEEDBACK IN L2 INSTRUCTION: AN OVERVIEW

AUTHOR: ELENI AGATHOPOULOU

SCHOOL OF ENGLISH, ARISTOTLE UNIVERSITY OF THESSALONIKI
EMAIL: AGATHO@ENL.AUTH.GR

Citation:

Agathopoulou, E. (2020) Corrective feedback in L2 instruction: An overview, Journal of Applied Languages and Linguistics, 4(3), pp. 26-31

Abstract

The usefulness of corrective feedback (CF) is taken for granted by many EFL teachers. However, research shows that whether CF is beneficial on language development may depend on the target language items, the types of CF, the teaching approach, the learning task at hand, the learners’ age, literacy, language proficiency, working memory, as well as psychological factors. After a brief introduction to the subject, I will present findings from relevant research in EFL in Greece and will discuss the implications of these findings for language teachers.

© Applied Language Studies House Publications 2020. All rights reserved.


Keywords: corrective feedback, EFL, language development

TITLE: THE TREATMENT OF FALSE FRIENDS IN ENGLISH AND ENGLISH-GREEK ADVANCED LEARNER DICTIONARIES

AUTHOR: ANNA VACALOPOULOU

INSTITUTE FOR LANGUAGE AND SPEECH PROCESSING (ILSP), GREECE
EMAIL: AVACALOP@ATHENARC.GR

Citation:

Vacalopoulou, A. (2020). The treatment of false friends in English and English-Greek advanced learner dictionaries, Journal of Applied Languages and Linguistics, 4(3), pp. 32-39

Abstract

This paper will describe an empirical study of the treatment of false friends in English and English-Greek advanced learner dictionaries. The goal is to compare between monolingual and bilingual works to see whether the intended end audience plays a role in the inclusion of this type of language specific information.


© Applied Language Studies House Publications 2020. All rights reserved.


Keywords: false friends, monolingual vs bilingual works, advanced learner dictionaries

oriented; assessment

TITLE: HOW TO MASTER PRE-SERVICE FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEACHERS’ INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION SKILLS

AUTHOR: IRYNA PINIUTA

BARANOVICI STATE UNIVERSITY, BELARUS
EMAIL: PINYUTA@MSN.COM

Citation:

Piniuta, I. (2020) How to master pre-service foreign language teachers’ intercultural communication skills, Journal of Applied Languages and Linguistics, 4(3), pp. 40-46

Abstract

The paper examines the teaching strategies that are used to master pre-service foreign language teachers’ intercultural communication skills which are necessary for cultural mediation in the classroom and in social activities. The learner-centered approach has determined the choice of the strategies of students’ cognitive engagement and problem based learning. It has been suggested to analyze cultural knowledge acquisition, structuring and application as the ways to develop lower order thinking. Problem based learning is implemented in multilevel problem solving tasks to master high order thinking. On the criteria of the complexity of the instruction, the algorithm to solve the problem, and the drawn conclusions, three level complexity activities have been designed for pre-service foreign language teachers’ intercultural training. The process of mastering intercultural communication skills has been illustrated with exercises on the material about Scottish, English, American, and Belarusian cultures, and combined with digital technology.


© Applied Language Studies House Publications 2020. All rights reserved.


Keywords: lacuna; mediator; learner centred approach; foreign language teacher; cognitive engagement; problem based learning; complexity; activity

TITLE: #MEEPLEINTHECLASSROOM:  USING BOARD GAMES FOR TEACHING THE GREEK LANGUAGE 

AUTHOR: ATHANASIOS KARASIMOS

ACADEMY OF ATHENS, GREECE
EMAIL: AKARASIMOS@ACADEMYOFATHENS.GR

Citation:

Karasimos, A. (2020) #MeepleInTheClassroom:  Using board games for teaching the Greek language, Journal of Applied Languages and Linguistics, 4(3), pp. 47-53

Abstract

This paper probes into the merged area between language pedagogy, young and adult learners, and centers on weaving multi-genres board games (both physical and digital ones) in Greek language teaching. All-genres of modern board games are ideal for language teaching and in concert with the tenets of the communicative approach to foreign language pedagogy. In this proposal, we will present specific board game selection criteria for presenting or eliciting language and a template of integrating every gaming genre. We will present a model wherein any board game can be used in the current Greek language classroom by tying them to the teaching of specific language skills. We propose that every genre can be used to teach a specific language skill, grammar or vocabulary (e.g., speaking via board game streaming presentation or writing with reviewing or commenting in a forum). We will suggest an extensive list of selection criteria, will provide several and extensive scenarios and will elaborate a concrete theoretical (board) game-based language learning and teaching approach.


© Applied Language Studies House Publications 2020. All rights reserved.


Keywords: board games, language teaching, language learning, skills acquisition

TITLE: REACHING THE LAST CHILD: POST COVID-19 TEACHING AND LEARNING RESOURCES

AUTHOR: KIRTI KAPUR

PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION IN LANGUAGES
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH AND TRAINING
NEW DELHI, INDIA
EMAIL: KKAPUR07@YAHOO.COM, KKAPUR07@GMAIL.COM

Citation:

Kapur, K. (2020) Reaching the Last Child: Post Covid-19 Teaching and Learning Resources, Journal of Applied Languages and Linguistics, 4(3), pp. 54-60

Abstract

Policy-makers and educationists have turned to technological innovation and digital pedagogy post Covid-19 to ensure that learning spaces remain functional. This paper discusses language teaching related policy and curricular practices in India and examines questions of learning outcomes and competencies based on a short survey with teachers of ELT. It also underlines the importance of taking into account the participation gap, arising from socio-economic disparity, while choosing appropriate methodology. To be able to reach the last child in the last village of the country during this pandemic educators and policy makers have had to identify a range of digital and non- digital modalities. When multi-modal and multisensory experiences are built into the teaching and learning process, holistic development of learners can be achieved. It is in this approach that one might find a blueprint for the future.


© Applied Language Studies House Publications 2020. All rights reserved.


Keywords: covid-19, technological innovation, digital pedagogy, language teaching, curricular practices, survey, multi-modal & multisensory experiences, learning process, holistic development 

LERC2020 SUMMARY

AUTHOR: ALEXANDRA GREEN

LERC2020 MEMBER OF THE ORGANISING COMMITTEE

EMAIL: INFO@ALS-EDU.COM

Alexandra Green holds an MA in the Management of Language Learning; TESOL and a BA Joint Honours in French and Italian, with German as a subsidiary.
Alexandra has been involved in foreign language teaching for the past 20 years, primarily in Greece, and she is currently the Academic Director of EUROGNOSI SA, a large chain of foreign language schools operating in Greece, Cyprus and Romania. In this capacity, her primary responsibilities include teacher assessment and recruitment, teacher training, presenting at global events and evaluating and subsequently implementing new technologies in the syllabus.
Alexandra is a Speaking examiner and Team Leader for the Cambridge Assessment English examinations, a Lead Trainer at ALS Delta House and the author of a number of ELT Skills, Grammar and writing books, in cooperation with Heinle/National Geographic ELT and Hamilton House ELT. She is a member of the Cambridge English presenter team.

SUMMARY

Despite the challenging nature of 2020 owing to the Covid-19 pandemic, the 2nd International Conference on Language Education and research went off with a bang and managed to inspire all involved in this illuminating annual conference, where delegates from over twenty different countries and five continents, comprising academics, researchers, students and educators, gather to voice their opinions, share presentations and project research findings.
Hosted and meticulously organised by the Academic Institution Applied Language Studies House, this year’s conference was held exclusively online and was aptly entitled New Challenges for the 21st century in ELT.
In order to whet participants’ appetite, the conference kicked off with a pre-conference event, opened by Dr Paschalis Chliaras, chairman of ALS House, and participants enjoyed presentations by Roxanne Holly Padley, from the University of Salerno, Italy, who discussed student motivation and performance issues in today’s classroom owing to Covid-19 and Alistair Barnes, ALS House, who focused on Discourse Management issues in learner Writing.
Dr Eleni Agathopoulou, plenary speaker and Associate Professor in Applied Linguistics at the School of English Language and Literature, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, opened the first day of the conference and engaged the audience during her presentation on Corrective feedback in the EFL classroom. Dr Agathopoulou passed the baton to Plenary Speaker Professor David Crystal, who gave an enlightening speech on New challenges: the role of Pragmatics.
An amalgamation of presentations ensued; participants relished in speeches including the role of English as a global language, Academic English, vocabulary teaching and the development of expository writing skills and then took a well-earned lunch break, after which they eagerly awaited the afternoon sessions. The latter touched on topics such as learning in the virtual classroom, language assessment, task-based grammar, inquiry-based learning, parental involvement and error analysis but to name a few, and the much-anticipated Q & A sessions provided speakers with the opportunity to delve deeper into their topics and further share their knowledge.
62 Journal of Applied Languages and Linguistics Volume 4 Issue 3 / December 2020
© Applied Language Studies House Publications 2020 – The contents of this publication may not be reproduced without the written
permission of the copyright holder
Bring on day two, was, I am sure, the thought occupying participants’ mind and so the day began with a truly remarkable and thought-provoking presentation by plenary speaker Scott Thornbury, Twenty years of ‘grammar McNuggets’. A wide array of topics was to follow, some of which are the sign of the times, namely; Education for Refugees and Migrants, the impact of immersion and non-immersion, CALL, the evaluation of mobile apps in language instruction and game-based teaching.
Yet there was far more to come. The day culminated in Plenary Speaker Professor Douglas Biber taking the floor, so to speak, in order to deliver a presentation entitled Complexity in academic writing: The development of phrasal discourse styles, and it is during this speech that everyone involved in this conference had the pleasure of indulging in a gripping interchange between two of the Keynote speakers, Scott Thornbury and Douglas Biber. Thornbury asked for an example of nominalization and after contemplating whether or not this was a trick question, Biber went on to explain that a prime example is a modifier, adding that he uses nominalization in a morphological sense. An interesting exchange of ideas ensued, ensuring maximum engagement for the audience.
Suffice it to say that after this grand finale, there is one phrase we can safely say is at the tip of our tongues; bring on the 3rd International Conference on Language Education and research.
Congratulations ALS House on organising a truly vibrant, educational conference and well done to all delegates for their truly informative presentations that afforded participants with further insights into this field.
Till we meet again!

BOOK REVIEW

TITLE:  THE TECHNOLOGY FOR THE LANGUAGE CLASSROOM

REVIEWER:  DR PASCHALIS CHLIARAS FHEA

PUBLISHER: PALGRAVE

Reviewer:
Dr Paschalis Chliaras (PhD in Applied Linguistics and SLA) is an EAP/ESP (UG/PG) and TESOL Lecturer, Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, UK, TEFL-Qualified, Cambridge Delta Tutor, Chairman and Director of the Research Centre for Applied Languages and Linguistics, Expert for the Key Activity 2 – Languages Transversal Programme, EU, Cambridge Centre Exams Manager and Presessional EAP Tutor, University of Birmingham & University of Warwick, UK. He is a member of IATEFL and a member of BALEAP and has given 16 presentations at major conferences in the UK, Turkey and Greece in the last 6 years. He is the founder of the Academic Institution Applied Language Studies House.

Book: Technology for the Language Classroom
Name of Author: Leonardo A.Mercado
Year and place of publication: 2017
Publisher: Red Globe Press
Number of Pages: 256
Price 2020: € 28.99 at Macmillan International
ISBN: 9781137497840 (Paperback)

 

CONTACT US

1 Victoria Square
B1 1BD, Birmingham, West Midlands, UK

+44(0)1216160258 OR +44(0)7552119512

 

©2021 by Journal of Applied Languages and Linguistics. Proudly created with Wix.com

This site was designed with the
.com
website builder. Create your website today.
Start Now